Monday, September 1, 2014

When Your Child Won't Sit Still: Tips for Reading with Your Active Toddler

Reading to an active little toddler requires a certain skill set. Today my post is for parents who feel like it's impossible to get their child to sit down to read for even a second. 

If your toddler is anything like mine, he's climbing on the tables and chairs, throwing balls (or sometimes less gentle objects like blocks), and coloring in places he's not supposed to. One second he wants up. The next second he wants down....and what he definitely doesn't want is to sit still. 

So reading a story together? That takes actual effort! On my part, and his. 

What can you do when your toddler is more interested in climbing the coffee table and throwing books, than reading them on your lap?



Here are my best tips for reading with that busy toddler that I have found to work well. Follow these suggestions and I bet you'll begin to connect in ways that make reading more enjoyable for the both of you.

  •  Do an activity or craft before you read together to spark interest in the story. Make connections from your activity while you are reading for additional learning and repetition of concepts. 

  • Make reading aloud a more fun experience. Your child doesn't want to sit still? Then don't! Act out the story, use puppets, sing the words, or play games while you read. The bonus of this technique is that your toddler will be motivated to read again.

  • Let your child take the lead. Allow him to select a book that is interesting to him. If he seems more interested in the pictures than listening to the story, take a picture walk through the book instead of reading the words.

  • Take advantage of meal times when your child is likely to be strapped in his high chair. Sneak in a story before, during, or after his meal. Reading while eating is better than flipping on that TV!

  • Read before bed when your toddler is likely to be “played out”. There is evidence to show that bedtime routines that include stories aid in language development.

  • Did your little one “read” a book all by himself? Initiate reading on his own? Recognize a job well done. Give your child praise when appropriate which will help him associate accomplishment with the act of reading. 

  • Select books that connect to something going on in your life at the time. For example, if you are taking a vacation to the beach, read books about the ocean or sea animals. If the story is relevant, he'll more likely be interested in it.

  • Get rid of the idea of what a read aloud "should" look like. It's wonderful if your child sits in your lap while you read like you see in all of your Pinterest pins. Life isn't always ideal though. Read aloud while your child is playing. Even if it seems like he's not listening, he might be more than you think. He might even surprise you and wander over into your lap as you read, creating that picture perfect moment.

  • Read the same story over and over. If your toddler has a favorite book that he actually CAN sit still to listen to 100 times in a row - that's OK! Children learn through repetition. In this post, I share ways to keep the learning going, even when it's the 100th read through!



There will be good days, there will be bad days but aim for 20 minutes EACH DAY. 
You will be so delighted you put forth the effort!


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